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New Crayons: The AFCC Edition

New Crayons is a meme started by Susan at Color Online, and it is about sharing the books one has bought, received, or borrowed over the past week. For my New Crayons post this week, I'll be listing the books I bought and received while in Singapore for the Asian Festival of Children's Content (AFCC). Watch out for my reviews of these books!


7 Science Fiction Stories (Scholastic India, 2006)

The Best Eid Ever by Asma Mobin-Uddin and illustrated by Laura Jacobsen (Boyds Mills Press, 2007)

A Blue Cat's Tale by Sangeetha Madhavan and illustrated by Michelle Chang (Straits Times Press Children, 2008)

The Broken Tusk: Stories of the Hindu God Ganesha retold by Uma Krishnaswami and illustrated by Maniam Selven (August House Publishers, 2005)

Anything But A Grabooberry by Anushka Ravishankar and Rathna Ramanathan (Tara Publishing, 2004)

Baby Panda Finds His Way by Emily Lim and illustrated by Li Dan (Autumn Wonders, 2009)

The Boy Without A Name
by Idries Shah and illustrated by Mona Caron (Hoopoe Books, 2007)

Bunny Finds the Right Stuff by Emily Lim and illustrated by Neal Sharp (Mustard Seed Books, 2009)

The Diary of Amos Lee: I Sit, I Write, I Flush! by Adeline Foo and illustrated by Stephanie Wong (Epigram, 2010)

Dots and Lines: A Teaching Resource for Art by Tarit Bhattacharjee (Tulika Publishers, 2008)

The Doughty Warriors: It's Our Forest Too! by Brenda Broster (B B Books, 2009)

The Elephant and the Tree written and illustrated by Jin Pyn Lee (Running Press Kids, 2009)

Five Plays for Children by Vijay Tendulkar and translated by Dr. Ajay Joshi (Scholastic India, 2008)

Georgette's Mooncakes by Adeline Foo and illustrated by Lee Kowling (Ethos Books, 2009)

Harry Straw Hat by Serene Wee and illustrated by Conrad Raquel (Scholastic Malaysia, 2009)

Harsha Vardhana
by Devika Rangachari (Scholastic India, 2009)

Hungry Ghosts by Sally Heinrich (Lothian Children's Books, 2007)

Jameela by Rukhsana Khan (Allen&Unwin, 2010)

Jeri Telstar and the Biggest Secret in the World
by Nury Vittachi and illustrated by Eamonn O'Boyle (PPP Company Limited, 2008)

Jeri Telstar and the Small Black Dog That Talked Like the President by Nury Vittachi and illustrated by Eamonn O'Boyle (PPP Company Limited, 2008)

Just Teddy by Emily Lim and illustrated by Neal Sharp (Mustard Seed Books, 2010)

Liquid City Volume One
edited by Sonny Liew (Image Comics, 2008)

Mahabharata Volume One: The Game by Soma Guha (Scholastic India, 2007)

Mahabharata Volume Two: The War by Soma Guha (Scholastic India, 2007)

The Mathematics of Twins by Sheila Dhir and illustrated by A. Edathatta and S. Onteddu (Scholastic India, 2007)

The Moustache Maharishi and Other Unlikely Stories (Scholastic India, 2007)

My Mother's Garden written and illustrated by Emila Yusof (OneRedFlower Press, 2010)

Naming Maya by Uma Krishnaswami (Farrar Straus Giroux, 2004)

Night of the Moon: A Muslim Holiday Story by Hena Khan and illustrated by Julie Paschkis (Chronicle Books, 2008)

Out of the Way! Out of the Way! by Uma Krishnaswami and illustrated by Uma Krishnaswamy (Tulika Publishers, 2010)

Present by Serene Wee (Read Plus, 2009)

Prince Bear & Pauper Bear by Emily Lim and illustrated by Neal Sharp (Mustard Seed Books, 2010)

School Ahead! by Paro Anand (Scholastic India, 2006)

The Smart Little Ella by Djoko Hartanto and illustrated by Daud Budi Surya (PT Concept Media, 2009)

Style-O-Wot: A Girl's Guide to Looking Great by Sapna Bhavnani and illustrated by Anushka Anand (Scholastic India, 2009)

Superhero: The Fabulous Adventures of Rocket Kumar and Other Indian Superheroes (Scholastic India, 2007)

To Market! To Market! by Anushka Ravishankar and illustrated by Emanuele Scanziani (Tara Publishing, 2008)

Totto-chan: The Little Girl at the Window by Tetsuko Kuroyanagi and translated by Dorothy Britton (Kodansha International, 1999)

What Shall I Make? by Nandini Nayar and illustrated by Proiti Roy (Tulika Publishers, 2009)


Below are pictures of the official bookstore for the AFCC 2010, which is where I bought most of these books!






What new books did you buy, receive, or borrow this week? :o)

Comments

  1. I bought Monkey Photo (Tara Books) and borrowed Battle Royale by Takami Koushun at the library. I guess they're not really multicultural since they don't mix several cultures, but since I'm in Sweden it'll have to do...

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm reading Naming Maya. It's younger than I thought. I am enjoying. Loved reading your lists. Would see what I can find at our library.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Escaping the Tiger by Laura Manivog from the library. Got His Own Where by June Jordan from work.

    Thanks for sharing all these books. Like Susan, will see if I can find a few at my library in the future.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Chen, YAY for Tara Books! And I enjoyed reading Battle Royale. Good pulp fiction. :o)

    You've helped me realize a boo boo. New Crayons is about books written by people of color and/or featuring characters of color. Thanks, Chen!

    Susan, I attended three of Uma Krishnaswami's talks at the festival. She was so awesome and such a great teacher!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi, Doret! :o) I really want to read Escaping the Tiger!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I started to look up some of these titles. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I hope you find them, Medeia! :o)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hey Tarie - You have an award over here http://mardel-rabidreader.blogspot.com/2010/05/blog-award.html -

    It's not one of those that involve lot's of work - :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Tarie -
    Lucky you! Looks like a lovely selection of books. When I came back from the Bologna Book Fair my suitcase was so heavy with the books I got that I almost had to pay for overweight baggage!

    Look forward to reading your reviews.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Hi, Corinne! I was booked on a budget airline - so I did have to pay for overweight baggage! Hahahaha.

    ReplyDelete

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