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Asian Festival of Children's Content 2011


The Asian Festival of Children's Content (AFCC) 2011 is:

* the Asian Children’s Writers & Illustrators Conference
* the Asian Children’s Publishers Symposium
* the Asian Primary and Preschool Teachers Congress
* and the Asian Children’s Media Summit

It will be held at The Arts House in Singapore from May 26-28 (with a pre-event panel discussion on May 25), and this year's theme is Connecting with Connected Kids.
"Once upon a cyberspace, children explored the world through libraries, bedtime tales and story books. Books are still around, but they are looking different. As technology puts media access into children's pockets and bedrooms, how do content makers stay connected with connected kids?

Join experts from around the world at Asia's gateway to the international children's content market. Celebrate, contemplate and collaborate on exciting new ways to engage, educate and empower the world's children on a global stage through uniquely Asian content."

Speakers for this year's AFCC include:

* award-winning children's book author and illustrator Choi Yangsook (Korea/U.S.)
* literary agent Kelly Sonnack (U.S.)
* publishing director of Scholastic India, Sayoni Basu (India)
* editorial director of Neal Porter Books, Neal Porter (U.S.)
* children's book author and lecturer Pooja Makhijani (U.S./Singapore)
* award-winning children's book author Emily Lim (Singapore)
* founder of the educational television channel The Knowledge Channel, Elvina Lopez-Bautista (Philippines)
* developer of the BBC children's channels CBBC and CBeebies, Greg Childs (U.K.)

And many more! I am also a speaker for this year's AFCC. There will be a panel discussion on blogging on May 25, 5:30-7 p.m., at The Arts House. I will be talking about the kidlitosphere and YA blogosphere along with Corinne Robson, associate editor of Paper Tigers, and Dr. Myra Garces-Bascal, founder of Gathering Books.

Click on the image below for more details about the panel discussion:


I hope to see you during the panel discussion and other activities of the AFCC. I attended the AFCC last year and had an AMAZING time. I learned SO MUCH. Click here to read my blog posts about AFCC 2010.

Comments

  1. Truly exciting indeed. Looking forward to spending more time with you this May, Tarie. Finally. This has taken off. A full 90-minute panel discussion. It's bound to be great. Looking forward to having a great time during the entire Festival.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Looking forward to working with you, Myra! :o)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sweet, looking forward to the blog post again. But please don't show too many food pics. They make me hungry.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Doret, I can't promise anything! The food in Singapore is just too good! * droooooool *

    ReplyDelete
  5. Try to take pictures of empty plates with crumbs, so I won't know what I am missing.

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  6. This is something that we should be taking part and the Philippines should do the same, or should host in the future. Im looking forward to reading your updates!

    I love children's books... it reminded of those younger years that I was deprived of reading them because of poverty! Im now making-up those years...appreciating these stories - laugh, cry...smile most of the time!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi, Reymos! It is most awesome that you are reading children's books as an adult. (^O^)

    ReplyDelete

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