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The International Book Giving Day BLOG HOP!


Hi, guys! How are you? Exactly one week ago was International Book Giving Day (a day to give children new, used, or borrowed books!) and I know many of you book lovers celebrated. I celebrated by giving my neighbors' kids copies of But That Won't Wake Me Up!, written by Annie and Anelka Lumbao and illustrated by Liza Flores (Adarna House, 2010). Please, please share how YOU celebrated!

To participate in the International Book Giving Day Blog Hop:

1. For those without a blog, please share your stories in the comments section of this blog post. =D

2. For those with a blog, write a post describing how you celebrated International Book Giving Day. A short and sweet post (e.g. a photo of you or your child giving away a book) is welcome!

3. Click on the "Add your link" button below and add the link to your post. Don't forget to check out the International Book Giving Day blog posts from all over the world!


Comments

  1. We had a heartwarming celebration of Intl. Book Giving Day last Feb. 14! I was invited by a friend, Andrea Macaventa, who organized her own community activity in Alabang(Philippines)for a storytelling session.
    A kids' yoga teacher and educator, Krissy Invento-Manalo, shared Shel Silverstein's "The Missing Piece." Cervin Bariso of the Children's Hour Foundation, read Ramon Sunico's "Two Friends, One World" to the children and I shared with them the story I made with my daughter Anelka entitled "But That Won't Wake Me Up." Children and adults alike appreciated so much the illustrations that Liza Flores made for this book.

    It was an afternoon of storytelling, book giving and raffle excitement for the kids.
    I donated a copy of our book But That Won't Wake Me Up to the venue owner for the library they had in their French-themed restaurant, Le Petit Cheri at Molito, Alabang. The owner Edna Cureg also donated a full cart of her children's old books for the Children's Hour foundation, one of the participants for the storytelling session. To add excitement to the event, we had children write their names in colored papers and put them in a jar for a book raffle of But That Won't Wake Me Up. Naya and Robyn went home with the signed copies they won from the raffle.

    Though I failed to implement my original plan for that day which was to leave a book in the waiting area of a pediatric clinic in our community (since the clinic was closed when i got there), i had a wonderful time going all the way South from the North (Quezon City, where I live) to join and connect with another group celebrating the Intl. Book Giving Day and successfully gave out books for child readers and donated one for a library. We simply gave our time, our friendship and our books and we all had a memorable day together.
    We wish more kids can join us in this activity next year!
    This connection with other book lovers happened through sharing of the International Book Giving Day poster in Facebook. Thanks for sharing this event with me, I was able to share it too with others. How lovely to think that a lot of children around the world enjoyed their own celebration of Feb.14.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, Tarie! For this post and for all of your efforts to invited people to celebrate International Book Giving Day! -Amy

    ReplyDelete
  3. I wish everyone could read Annie Pacaña-Lumbao's story. It sounds like she and others organized a great storytime session for International Book Giving Day!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Annie! Thank you so much for sharing your story. You and your friends gave so much love to children on International Book Giving Day. :o)

    Amy, thank YOU for organizing International Book Giving Day and for inviting me to be a part of the team!

    ReplyDelete

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