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GIVEAWAY: Bumasa at Lumaya 2: A Sourcebook on Children's Literature in the Philippines


I'm giving away three copies of Bumasa at Lumaya 2: A Sourcebook on Children's Literature in the Philippines (Anvil Publishing Inc., 2016)! This is a collection of English and Filipino essays, interviews, and other discussions edited by Ani Rosa Almario, Neni Sta. Romana Cruz, and Ramon C. Sunico, trailblazers in the Philippines' children's book industry.

For a chance to win a copy of Bumasa at Lumaya 2, all you need to do is leave a comment on this post. Write your name, email address, and one sentence about why you want to learn more about Filipino children's literature. I will randomly select three winners at 9 p.m. (Philippine time) on Wednesday, July 27. This is an international giveaway! :o)

EDIT: There appears to be something wrong with the comments section. :o( I apologize for that. Please shoot an email to asiaintheheart@yahoo.com to join the giveaway! Thank you!

For more information about the book, visit the other stops on the Bumasa at Lumaya blog tour:


Author Interview: Zarah Gagatiga at Cinderella Stories




I'll end this post with the cover of Bumasa at Lumaya 2 and a list of all the resources you can find in it. See you in the comments section!



Kay Sarap Magbasa! by Rene O. Villanueva
Introduction by Neni Sta. Romana Cruz
Ang Panitikang Pambata sa Filipinas: 2000-2013 by Eugene Y. Evasco
Saan Nagpupunta ang Araw Kung Gabi? Pagsulat ng Kuwentong Bata by Rene O. Villanueva
12 Questions with Rene O. Villanueva by Neni Sta. Romana Cruz
Quite Contrary: A New Direction for Poetry for Filipino Children by Lara Saguisag
Ang Muling Pagsasalaysay ng Mga Kuwento ni Lola Basyang by Christine Bellen
Writers' Forum 2008 (Ramon C. Sunico, Luis P. Gatmaitan, Mailin Paterno Locsin, Russell Molina, Carla Pacis, and Augie Rivera)
Sulataktakan: Conversations on Children's Literature moderated by Zarah Gagatiga:
     Stories are Everywhere by Mailin Paterno Locsin
     Magic Secrets, Revealed by Russell Molina
     A Love for Fantastic Worlds and Insects by Jomike Tejido
     Writers and Verbs, Artists and Adjectives by Beth Parrocha
     Healing with Words by Luis P. Gatmaitan
Filling the Gap: Young Adult Literature in the Philippines by Carla Pacis and Ramon C. Sunico
The Filipino Young Adult Novel: A Safe Place: How My First Novel I Hate My Mother! Came to Be by Perpilili Vivienne Tiongson
How I Write by Lin A. Flores
Telling the Truth: Nonfiction for Children by Mailin Paterno Locsin
Pages and Spreads, Pictures and Styles: Visual Directions in Filipino Children's Books: 1983-2014 by Ruben de Jesus
Children's Book Illustrations in the Philippines: 1990-2007 by Liza Flores
The Magic of the Frozen Moment: A Crash Course in Comics Appreciation by Paolo Chikiamco
For Love of Reading by Neni Sta. Romana Cruz
A Library for Children and Young People by Zarah Gagatiga
A Roundtable Discussion with Reading Educators by Ani Rosa Almario, Dr. Leonor Diaz, Dr. Dina Ocampo, and Dr. Felicitas Pado
Awards and Recognition for Philippine Children's Literature: 1978-2015
The PBBY Salanga and PBBY Alcala Awards: 1984-2015
The 25 Best-Loved Filipino Children's Book Characters

Comments

  1. I'd like to know more about Filipino children's lit, so I'd know which books would be a good influence to my nieces, especially the ones with strong female protagonists they can relate to :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Nicole, nicolezapanta.ph@gmail.com

    I want to learn more about Filipino children's literature because I want to learn about Philippine indigenous plants and animals through fun and happy stories! (=^.^=)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Christian Robert Nalica, cbnalica@up.edu.ph, I want to learn more about Filipino children's literature because i want to write one someday and read my own stories to my grandchildren God willing

    ReplyDelete

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