Skip to main content

The Kidlitosphere, Pop-Up Books, the Knowledge Channel, and Short Films


I had the great privilege of being a speaker and facilitator at the 2011 Asian Festival of Children's Content in Singapore. It was an honor - and great fun! - to be part of a panel discussion with Corinne Robson, associate editor and blog "Eventful World" coordinator of PaperTigers, and Dr. Myra Garces-Bascal, educator and founder of GatheringBooks. (Thank you so much, Myra, for putting the panel together!)

Our panel discussion was an introduction to the kidlitosphere and the YA blogosphere, and how Web 2.0 can be used to build a world of readers. I really believe in the power Web 2.0 has in building a world of readers. From the family of children's book bloggers to book trailers that create a need for YA books, and book fandoms on Tumblr to authors interacting with their fans through Twitter and Facebook, the book blogosphere and Web 2.0 in general can be very effective in strengthening and growing the community of readers. I could talk about this topic all day! If you attended the panel discussion, THANK YOU, and if you would like to continue the conversation on Web 2.0 and building a world of readers, please feel free to email me at asiaintheheartATyahooDOTcom. :o)



I am proud of the three sessions I facilitated:

Andrew Yeo of Tien Wah Press (one of the first two companies in the world to manufacture pop-up books!) presented a short history of the pop-up book and a detailed introduction to the paper engineering behind the pop-up book. I was amazed by how Andrew explained everything from the different kinds of pop-up books and how long it takes to put them together, to their paper and binding and recommended print runs!

After the very informative presentation, the audience gathered around Andrew's display to oooh and aaah over some of the pop-up books Tien Wah Press has produced over the years.




I also facilitated a presentation on the use of television in children's education by Rina Lopez-Bautista, founder of the Knowledge Channel, a television channel dedicated to bringing education and valuable teacher training to schools all over the Philippines. From the discussion at the end of the presentation emerged an idea well worth pursuing: Why not have an educational channel for children, like the Knowledge Channel, for the whole of Asia? I hope the session was already the first step to making this happen.


The last session I facilitated was educator Dennis Yeo's very helpful talk on how to use short films in the classroom to develop the critical thinking (visual literacy, prediction strategies, etc.) of students. From this session I picked up a lot of ideas for my own classes. Dennis' tips can be applied to teaching children, teens, and even adult learners!

ETA: Dennis is obviously a very good teacher. He was energetic, really engaged the audience, and gave us a lot to chew on!


Please watch this space because I was galvanized by the 2011 Asian Festival of Children's Content and will be blogging more about it over the next few days. :o)

Comments

  1. I love pop up books. They are very involved and intricate and yet a toddler can destroy them within minutes! I bought my granddaughter at least 6 pop ups, all ruined. with my grandson, I've been buying them letting him use them with supervision - read to him, then put them up. At least they'll last longer - until he's mature enought NOT to tear at them. Of course the reason they get torn apart is because the kids are trying to figure out how they work. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Mardel, can you believe there are actual paper engineers for pop-up books? I didn't know until I heard Andrew's talk!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Ako'y Isang Mabuting Pilipino (I Am A Good Filipino) by Noel Cabangon and Jomike Tejido

This one is a real crowd pleaser: Ako'y Isang Mabuting Pilipino , Lampara Books ' 2012 picture book adaptation of Noel Cabangon 's song, with Cabangon's original Filipino lyrics, functional English translations by Becky Bravo , and illustrations by Jomike Tejido ! Cabangon's inspiring lyrics remind children of the ways they can be good Filipinos, such as doing their best in school and obeying their parents. There are plenty of reminders for adults too, such as following traffic rules and not selling their votes during elections. Tejido's illustrations are warm and wholesome, acrylic paintings on hand-woven mats that depict different ways to be good citizens.    You just can't go wrong with Ako'y Isang Mabuting Pilipino ! Children and adults will understand and appreciate the lyrics and paintings. The chords of the song are provided, so music lovers can play and sing along. There are notes and guide questions for educators. There is even

1st Philippine National Children's Book Awards

Yesterday was the announcement of the winners of the very first Philippine National Children's Book Awards (NCBA). The awards are for the very best children's and young adult books published in the Philippines (2008-2009). There are no categories and no rankings for the NCBA. And the NCBA does not only evaluate the text of the nominated books. Illustrations, book design, and even the materials used in printing and binding the books are evaluated when choosing the "best reads" for young people in the Philippines! I was a judge for the awards (yes, this is me revealing my sooper sekrit project!) and I am very proud to now share with you the six winners of the first NCBA. Below are the winners' covers and the judges' comments on the books. Araw sa Palengke ( Market Day ) Written by May Tobias-Papa Illustrated by Isabel Roxas Adarna, 2008 (In Filipino, with English translations) "Listen well," her mother tells her. "Hold on to me tightly, ha?

Author Interview: Mae Respicio

Happy Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month! How are you all celebrating? As part of my celebration, I'm sharing my chat with author Mae Respicio . Her middle grade novel The House That Lou Built (Wendy Lamb Books, 2018) is about Lou Bulosan-Nelson and her dream to build a tiny house (only 100 square feet!) all on her own and on land that she inherited from her father. This Filipino American coming-of-age story is the recipient of the Asian Pacific American Library Association (APALA) 2019 Honor Award in Children’s Literature . Keep reading to discover more about Mae and the book! Congratulations, Mae! What inspired you to write The House That Lou Built ? There were many things that inspired this book such as my love of building, my desire to write a strong girl at the center of a coming-of-age adventure, and wanting to write a book set in the Bay Area! Although above any of these things what kept me inspired throughout the (sometimes grueling!) writin